APPEALS COURT RULING BOLSTERS PROFESSOR’S FREE-SPEECH RIGHTS

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Free Speech Comes to Wazzu Campus

Appeals Court Ruling Bolsters Professors’ Free-Speech Rights

WSU Professor’s Plan to Improve Murrow Program Qualifies for Free-Speech Protection

A U.S. District Court judge erred when he ruled that a Washington State University professor was not entitled to First Amendment protection when he developed a controversial plan for restructuring and improving a journalism program, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal ruled Wednesday.

“The decision is a great victory for those who cherish academic freedom, free-speech ideals and shared governance,” said David Demers, a former tenured WSU professor who created the plan to improve the quality of education in the Edward R. Murrow School of Communication.

The megalomaniac differs from the narcissist by the fact that he wishes to be powerful rather than charming, and seeks to be feared rather than loved. To this type belong many lunatics and most of the great men of history.

Bertrand Russell

While psychopaths are estimated to number 2 to 5% of most cultures, they are disproportionately represented among politicians, administrators, managers, military, religious cult leaders and in entertainment.

While psychopaths are estimated to number 2 to 5% of most cultures, they are disproportionately represented among politicians, administrators, managers, military, religious cult leaders and in entertainment.


REVIEW OF SNAKES IN SUITS

“Professors should be able to criticize administrators and their policies and play an active role in the affairs of the university,” added Demers, who left the university in 2012 and currently teaches a mass media law course in The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. “The decision bolsters the idea that free-speech protection for professors extends beyond their academic research programs and the classroom. It covers our service role, too.”

Demers brought suit in 2010 alleging that four university administrators retaliated against him for distributing a “7-Step Plan” that sought to improve the quality of the Murrow program (Demers v. Austin, et al.).

The plan asked university administrators to give more power to professional faculty, to seek national accreditation for the Murrow School, and to remove a non-journalism major from the school. The latter program only served 60 of the 1,000 majors in the Murrow School but was consuming one-fourth of the school’s resources, Demers said. Demers also offered to donate $100,000 of his own money if the university implemented the plan.

University administrators ignored the plan.

When he submitted the plan, Demers said he assumed his speech was protected under the principles of shared governance and academic freedom.

The WSU administrator-defendants disagreed.

But instead of fighting the lawsuit on its merits, the defendants asked Spokane District Court Judge Robert H. Whaley to declare that professors, as employees, do not deserve First Amendment protection.

Whaley agreed and threw the case out of court before it went to trial.

To support his decision, he cited the 2006 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Garcetti v. Ceballos, which held that government employees (an assistant prosecuting attorney in this case) are not entitled to free-speech protection, even if those employees report criminal wrongdoing on the part of other government workers (the attorney learned that police officers had fabricated evidence to obtain a search warrant).

The high court ruled 5-4 against the “whistle blower,” with the conservative justices outflanking the moderates and liberals. The majority essentially ruled that it is better to control employees than to expose corruption, Demers said.

But the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals panel, headed by Judge William A. Fletcher, ruled in the Demers case that Garcetti does not apply to professors, because “teaching and academic writing are at the core of the official duties of teachers and professors. Such teaching and writing are ‘a special concern of the First Amendment.’ … We conclude that if applied to teaching and academic writing, Garcetti would directly conflict with the important First Amendment values previously articulated by the Supreme Court.”

The appeals court ruling means that, to receive First Amendment protection, a professor’s speech must address matters of public concern and the professor’s interest in the matter must outweigh the state’s interest in promoting efficiency on the job.

The appeals court remanded the Demers case to the Spokane District Court for further review. A trial date has not been set.

The defendants could appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

But Demers said this would hurt the reputation of the Murrow program even more.

“From the beginning, it never made any sense that administrators working in and supervising the Murrow journalism and mass communication programs would argue that journalism professors don’t deserve free-speech protection,” Demers said. “I think this is a case of where the administrative bureaucracy was so focused on winning that it forgot about the importance of principles. Free speech is a principle worth defending.”

Demers said the ruling is another black mark on the administration of WSU President Elson Floyd, who in 2009 concealed a report from the Washington state Auditor’s Office which concluded that a WSU internal audit of Demers was tainted by a conflict of interest.

The appeals court also ruled that the defendants have qualified immunity from financial damages because the Ninth Circuit has never clarified Garcetti. This means Demers cannot seek punitive damages. But Demers, who said the case has cost him about $350,000 so far, said he didn’t care.

“This was a case about principles and free-speech rights, not money.”

The American Association of University Professors and the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression penned a friend-of-the-court brief in support of free-speech rights for faculty.

The appeals court ruling, if it stands, will affect public universities nine states, including Arizona, California, Nevada, Montana, Washington state, Idaho, Hawaii, Alaska and Utah.

Demers taught at WSU for 16 years. He quit in 2012 to spend more time writing about civil liberties issues.

WSU has implemented some aspects of Demers’ 7-Step Plan, but the Murrow program, now a college, is not accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The Cronkite School is.

For more information, contact
David Demers
509-290-9240
dkdemers@cox.net
Tags: Academic Standards, Free Speech, Jefferson, Washington State

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What you think you know about China
Professor Jim Craven discusses the common misconceptions the U.S. holds against China

By Alison Williams

Staff Writer

Published: Friday, February 18, 2011
Updated: Friday, February 18, 2011 16:02

What do you really know, or think you know, about China?

Jim Craven, economics professor at Clark College and consulting professor to Tsinghua University in China, was invited to answer this very question at the winter 2011 session of Clark’s Faculty Speaker Series on Feb. 8.

According to Rassoul Dastmozd, vice president of Instruction at Clark who helped secure funding for the program, the Faculty Speaker Series “showcases experiences that have enriched both the life and teaching of a Clark faculty member.” Faculty are chosen based on specific criteria, including whether or not their topic appeals to a broad audience, is current, and is an area of expertise for the speaker.

Craven began by addressing the current attitudes of the U.S. government toward the Chinese, which he said are based on Cold War stereotypes.

“One of the stereotypes is that everyone in China is a communist,” he said. “Not true.”

According to Craven only about 76 million people out of China’s total population of 1.3 billion people are members of the Communist Party. There are seven minor democratic parties in China that work with the ruling Communist Party of China.
Another stereotype that Craven pointed out was that China is hostile toward religion, when in fact their constitution proclaims freedom of religion to all citizens.

“Freedom of religion is protected under the constitution of China,” Craven said. “What is not protected in China is proselytizing. You cannot spread the faith.”

Craven also focused on the differences in international education between the U.S. and China. According to Craven, of the 240,000 foreigners in China as of 2009, only 14,000 are from the U.S. But of the 2.5 million international students worldwide, the U.S. hosts 22 percent. Craven showed the severe differences in motivation for U.S. and Chinese students. Chinese students are highly competitive and work hard to earn a limited number of spots at the top universities in China, according to Craven. But in the U.S. almost anyone can go to college, and education has lost its competitive edge, he said.

Craven compared the attitudes of the U.S. and Chinese governments toward each other, stating that the current attitude of our government toward China is that we can only learn how to better compete with them in a global market, while they need to understand and respect our values and capitalistic society. China, however, he said looks at the U.S. and says, “Live and let live.”

Lyn Ngaue, a current student of Craven’s, spent two years in the Tonga Islands of the South Pacific with her family. Based on her experiences among other cultures, she agreed with Craven that the best way for the U.S. and China to mend their relationship is by seeking understanding and acceptance when it comes to differences in culture and politics, instead of trying to figure out who’s right.

“I’m not surprised by anything he said,” Ngaue said.

Craven first visited China in the early ‘90s and taught there as recently as last year. He plans to return in the near future to continue teaching.

The spring 2011 Faculty Speaker Series will feature Kathy Bobula, a psychology and early childhood education professor, and will be titled “This is Your Brain on Bias…Or, The Neuroscience of Bias.” Bobula will speak on May 3 in PUB 258 B&C from 4-5:30 pm.

About jimcraven10

About jimcraven10 1. Citizenship: Blackfoot, U.S. and Canadian; 2. Position: tenured Professor of Economics and Geography; Dept. Head, Economics; 3. Teaching, Consulting and Research experience: approx 40 + years all levels high school to post-doctoral U.S. Canada, Europe, China, India, Puerto Rico and parts of E. Asia; 4. Work past and present: U.S. Army 1963-66; Member: Veterans for Peace; former VVAW; Veterans for 9-11 Truth; Scholars for 9-11 Truth; Pilots for 9-11 Truth; World Association for Political Economy; Editorial Board International Critical Thought; 4.. U.S. Commercial-Instrument Pilot ; FAA Licensed Ground Instructor (Basic, Advanced, Instrument and Simulators); 5. Research Areas and Publications: International law (on genocide, rights of nations, war and war crimes); Imperialism (nature, history, logic, trajectories, mechanisms and effects); Economic Geography (time and space modeling in political economy; globalization--logic and effects; Political Economy and Geography of Imperialism); Indigenous versus non-Indigenous Law; Political Economy of Socialism and Socialist Construction; 6. Member, Editorial Board, "International Critical Thought" published by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences; International Advisory Board and Columnist 4th Media Group, http://www.4thMedia.org (Beijing); 7. Other Websites publications at http://www.aradicalblackfoot.blogspot.com; wwwthesixthestate.blogspot.com;https://jimcraven10.wordpress.com; 8.Biography available in: Marquis Who’s Who: in the World (16th-18th; 20th; 22nd -31st (2014) Editions); Who’s Who in America (51st-61st;63rd-68th(2014) Editions); Who’s Who in the West (24th- 27th Editions);Who’s Who in Science and Engineering (3rd to 6th, 8th, 11th (2011-2012) Editions); Who’s Who in Finance and Industry (29th to 37th Editions); Who’s Who in American Education (6th Edition). ------------------- There are times when you have to obey a call which is the highest of all, i.e. the voice of conscience even though such obedience may cost many a bitter tear, and even more, separation from friends, from family, from the state, to which you may belong, from all that you have held as dear as life itself. For this obedience is the law of our being. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
This entry was posted in Academia and Academics, Academia as Fraud, Capitalism and Psycho-Sociopathy, Clark College, CLARK COLLEGE: PUBLIC DOCUMENTS ON SERIOUS ISSUES, Conspiracy against Rights and under Color of Law, Corruption and Intrigue in Government, CORRUPTION IN "HIGHER" EDUCATION, courage and treachery in government, Faces of Fascism, Fascism in America, FOUNDATIONS OF FASCISM IN AMERICA, Hubris and Braggadocio, IMPERIAL HUBRIS AND INTRIGUE, Imperial Hypocrisy and Intrigue, Meme Warfare and Imperialism, MSM Mainstream Media Sycophancy, New World Order, Psychopathic Management, Psychopaths and Sociopaths in Politics, Psychopaths in Management, U.S. CULTURE OF FEAR AND NARCISSISM. Bookmark the permalink.

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